SURA Cyberinfrastructure Workshop:

"Grid Application Planning & Implementation"

Texas Advanced Computing Center * University of Texas at Austin
December 6-8, 2005


Many universities and research networking organizations, including a significant number of SURA members, are actively planning and implementing shared cyberinfrastructure as a tool to enable their researchers, faculty and students to participate in e-Science initiatives. SURA has developed a series of workshops to help disseminate current best practices for effective deployment and enable e-Science participation at local, regional and national levels. The series is anticipated to continue over the next several years to meet the ongoing need for persistent sources of timely education on high interest cyberinfrastructure topics.

SURA Cyberinfrastructure workshops on Grid Application Planning & Implementation are targeted towards insuring that grid infrastructure development and deployment will meet the requirements of advanced applications. A first workshop was held January 2005 at Georgia State University. This second event mirrored the format of the first but with new content, increased sponsor/exhibitor interaction.

The event provided an opportunity for attendees to:

Presentations from major grid application initiatives illuminated the broader uses of grids, followed by case studies of "grid-enabled" application deployment in settings that range from institutional to international. Interactive sessions provided additional depth on key topics, and wrap-up presentations on networking, funding, technology trends and support provided guideance to advance grid application deployment.


AGENDA

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2005

Location: Commons Atrium and L'il Tex Auditorium, TACC

6:00-8:30 PM
(Keynote Address at 7:00 PM)
Welcome Registration & Keynote Address
"Building Grids: If Everyone Else Is Doing it, Why Shouldn't You?"

John R. Boisseau, PhD, Director, Texas Advanced Computing Center
ABSTRACT


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2005

Location: Commons Atrium and L'il Tex Auditorium, TACC

8:15-8:30 AM

Welcome & Opening Remarks
Gary Crane, Director, IT Initiatives, SURA

8:30-9:00 AM
"Grid Perspectives and Regional Activities"
Mary Fran Yafchak, IT Program Coordinator, SURA
ABSTRACT BIO

9:00 AM-12 Noon (Includes break from 10:10-10:40 AM)
"Parade of Grids"

"UT Grid: A Campus Cyberinfrastructure For Research & Education" (9:00-9:35 AM)
John R. Boisseau, Ph.D., Director, Texas Advanced Computing Center
ABSTRACT

Open Science Grid (OSG) (9:35-10:10 AM)
Paul Avery, Professor of Physics, University of Florida
ABSTRACT BIO

MGRID (Michigan Grid Research and Infrastructure Development) (10:40-11:15 AM)
Abhijit Bose, Associate Director, MGRID, University of Michigan
ABSTRACT
BIO

DOSAR (Distributed Organization of Scientific and Academic Research) (11:15-11:50 AM)
Zeno Dixon Greenwood, Ph.D. , Center for Applied Physics Studies (CAPS), Louisiana Tech University
ABSTRACT BIO

Views and Questions from the Audience (11:50 AM-12:00 PM)
Mary Fran Yafchak, SURA

12:00-1:00 PM
Lunch (provided)

1:00-3:30 PM (Includes break from 2:10-2:40 PM)
"How to Grid-Enable an Application"

ENDYNE: Electron Nuclear Dynamics Simulations on the Grid (1:00-1:35 PM)
Jerry Perez, Senior Administrator, High Performance Computing Center, Texas Tech University
ABSTRACT BIO

ADCIRC Coastal Modeling on the Grid (1:35-2:10 PM)
Lavanya Ramakrishnan, Senior Research Programmer, Renaissance Computing Institute
ABSTRACT BIO

Research on the World Community Grid (2:40-3:15 PM)
Viktors Berstis, Technical Lead, Architect & Scientist, WorldCommunityGrid.org, IBM Global Services/Grid Computing Initiative
ABSTRACT

Views and Questions from the Audience (3:15-3:30 PM)
Art Vandenberg, Director of Advanced Campus Services, Georgia State University

3:30-5:00 PM
"Ask-a-Grid-Expert" Panel & Interaction

This session will combine grid experts from each of the sponsor organizations and also the academic community for interaction and discussion on a variety of grid-related topics, with emphasis on questions and areas of interest from the audience.

Moderator: Art Vandenberg, Georgia State University
BIO

Panelists:

Brian Hammond Ph.D., Business Development Manager, Global Education and Research, Sun Microsystems, Inc.
BIO

Ed Hubbard, Founder & Chief Marketing Officer, United Devices
BIO

Matt Blythe (Cisco Systems)
BIO

Martin Maldanado, Senior Technical Architect, IBM Corporation

Paul Avery, Professor of Physics, University of Florida

Abhijit Bose, Associate Director, MGRID, University of Michigan

Lavanya Ramakrishnan, Senior Research Programmer, Renaissance Computing Institute

5:30-7:00 PM
Collaborators' Reception (with facilitation of topical dinner groups where interested)
(Dinner not included)


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2005

Location: Breakouts - Longhorn Room & Campus Room, TACC

8:15-8:30 AM

Reconvene & Instructions for Breakouts (In Auditorium)

8:30-10:00 AM
Topical Breakouts

Break-out-style discussion across a variety of key topics, including grid application requirements, authn/authz and security, integration with enterprise middleware, teaching with grids, others as time permits. Final topics selected based on a poll of attendees' interests.

Grid Operations & Support
Facilitator: Gary Crane, SURA

Research Applications/Grid-Enabling Applications
Facilitator: Jerry Perez, Texas Tech University

10:30 AM-12:30 PM
Further Context for Implementation

Presentations for added insight into important "peripheral" topics for successful grid-building: resources and processes for getting started, policies and mechanisms to enable sharing, operations and support, funding development and deployment.

OSG Grid Operations
Leigh Grundhoefer, Manager, Grid Operations, Indiana University
ABSTRACT BIO

Resources for Getting Started: The Culinary Art of Grids (11:10-11:50 AM)
Mary Trauner, IT/HPC Consultant, Georgia Institute of Technology &
Mary Fran Yafchak, IT Program Coordinator, SURA
ABSTRACT BIO

Report on the new National Science Foundation Office of Cyberinfrastructure (11:50 AM-12:30 PM)
Frank Scioli
, Program Director/Social, Behavioral and Economic Science Directorate, National Science Foundation, Office of Cyberinfrastructure-(On Detail)

12:30-12:45 PM
Adjourn Main Workshop & Box lunches available

-----------------------------------------

Post-event technology workshop: "Grid Technology: The Rough Guide"
A workshop for minds-on and hands-on experience in grid building (separate registration applies)
Thursday, December 8, 1:00 - 6:00 PM
Friday, December 9, 8:00 AM - 12:30 PM


Presentation Abstracts & Speaker Bios

"Building Grids: If Everyone Else Is Doing it, Why Shouldn't You?"
John R. Boisseau, PhD, Director, Texas Advanced Computing Center
ABSTRACT
Almost every major university, most government research laboratories, and many companies are building grids and/or developing grid technologies. Nonetheless, there are still relatively few examples of robust production grids, especially for general-purpose workloads and workflows. So, should you a) contribute to these efforts, or b) wait for grid technologies to mature and for other grid projects to lead the way (and perhaps solve your problems for you)? In this presentation we will review the current status of some major grid

"Grid Perspectives and Regional Activities"
Mary Fran Yafchak, IT Program Coordinator, SURA
ABSTRACT
This presentation will highlight some perspectives on the term "grid" for additional insight into why and how grid technology might be applied within current deployments, and in light of the evolving nature of grid technology, standards and applications. The presentation will also outline SURA activities that are helping to support grid deployment across the region and offer a guide to participation in those activities as well as within this workshop.
BIO
Mary Fran Yafchak is the IT Program Coordinator for SURA and works to further the development of regional information technology collaborations and their synergy with relevant national and international developments. She developed and managed the NSF Middleware Initiative Integration Testbed Program for SURA, in partnership with Internet 2, EDUCAUSE, and the GRIDS Center. In current and past roles, Mary Fran has enabled and supported diverse initiatives related to the development and dissemination of advanced network technologies. She also spent three years as an Internet trainer with the NYSERNet Information Technology Education Center (NITEC). Mary Fran holds a B.S. in Secondary Education/English from SUNY Oswego and a M.S. in Information Resource Management from Syracuse University.

"UT Grid: A Campus Cyberinfrastructure For Research & Education"
John R. Boisseau, Ph.D., Director, Texas Advanced Computing Center
ABSTRACT
The UT Grid project vision is to integrate the numerous and diverse computational, visualization, storage, data, and instrument/device resources of The University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin) into a comprehensive campus cyberinfrastructure for research and education. The integration of these vast resources - from 'personal scale' to terascale - will enable resource access and sharing on an unprecedented campus scale, while new Web-based and command-line interfaces will facilitate new models for utilization and coordination. The integrated cyberinfrastructure will offer new capabilities via production grid services (for both research and education), while also providing a platform for grid computing R&D. UT Grid will thus present a unique campus environment for knowledge discovery and education.

Open Science Grid (OSG)
Paul Avery, Professor of Physics, University of Florida
ABSTRACT
Since 1999, a collaboration of U.S. domain and computer scientists from universities and national laboratories has conducted a multifaceted R&D program to build large-scale Grid cyberinfrastructure in the U.S. This produced a wealth of results, including powerful new Grid tools and services; a uniform Grid middleware packaging scheme (the Virtual Data Toolkit); integration of complex Grid tools and services in large science applications; multiple education and outreach projects; and new approaches to integrating advanced network infrastructure in Grid applications. This has led to the creation of Open Science Grid, an international Grid of 50 sites and 15,000 processors serving multiple disciplines. OSG will also link many campus and regional grids, and much progress has been made in federating with TeraGrid (US), EGEE (Europe) and large grid projects in South America and Asia.
BIO
Paul Avery received his Ph.D in Physics from the University of Illinois in 1980 and is Professor of Physics at the University of Florida. His research is in experimental High Energy Physics and he participates in the CLEO experiment at Cornell University and the CMS experiment at CERN, Geneva. Dr. Avery is the Director of two national NSF-funded Grid projects, GriPhyN and the International Virtual Data Grid Laboratory (iVDGL). Both projects are developing Grid infrastructures for research projects with massive computational and data needs. He is Co-Pi of the NSF funded projects CHEPREO, UltraLight and DISUN and is one of the principals seeking to establish the Open Science Grid.Since 1999, a collaboration of U.S. domain and computer scientists from universities and national laboratories has conducted a multifaceted R&D program to build large-scale Grid cyberinfrastructure in the U.S. This produced a wealth of results, including powerful new Grid tools and services; a uniform Grid middleware packaging scheme (the Virtual Data Toolkit); integration of complex Grid tools and services in large science applications; multiple education and outreach projects; and new approaches to integrating advanced network infrastructure in Grid applications. This has led to the creation of Open Science Grid, an international Grid of 50 sites and 15,000 processors serving multiple disciplines. OSG will also link many campus and regional grids, and much progress has been made in federating with TeraGrid (US), EGEE (Europe) and large grid projects in South America and Asia.

MGRID (Michigan Grid Research and Infrastructure Development)
Abhijit Bose, Associate Director, MGRID, University of Michigan
ABSTRACT
Michigan Grid Research and Infrastructure Development (MGRID), (http://www.mgrid.umich.edu/) is a collaborative unit focused on developing and deploying an institutional computing grid for the University of Michigan. In this talk, we will explain several core building blocks of MGRID: authentication, authorization, scheduling and resource management, and user portal. We will present key findings and issues in deploying a large institutional grid such as MGRID. We will also share our experiences in deployment of grid-enabled applications.
BIO

Abhijit Bose is the associate director of MGrid (Michigan Grid Research and Infrastructure Development) at the University of Michigan. His research interests are enterprise resource scheduling and provisioning, and enterprise security. His group has developed MARS, an enterprise-level metascheduler for distributed data center resources such as CPUs, storage and license servers. Current work involves fault-tolerant scheduling and analytics for resource optimization. He has over 20 publications on parallel computing, networking, security and grid computing in peer-reviewed journals and international conferences. His research is funded by the National Science Foundation and US Naval Research Laboratory. Michigan Grid Research and Infrastructure Development (MGRID), (http://www.mgrid.umich.edu/) is a collaborative unit focused on developing and deploying an institutional computing grid for the University of Michigan. In this talk, we will explain several core building blocks of MGRID: authentication, authorization, scheduling and resource management, and user portal. We will present key findings and issues in deploying a large institutional grid such as MGRID. We will also share our experiences in deployment of grid-enabled applications.

DOSAR (Distributed Organization of Scientific and Academic Research)
Zeno Dixon Greenwood, Ph.D. , Center for Applied Physics Studies (CAPS), Louisiana Tech University
ABSTRACT
Member institutions of the DzeroØexperiment at the Fermilab Tevatron and the ATLAS or CMS experiments at the LHC in Europe, have formed the Distributed Organization for Scientific and Academic Research (DOSAR). A consortium of universities in the US, Brazil, Mexico and India, DOSAR is a federated computing grid organization encompassing numerous institutional grids. While founded for High Energy Physics (HEP) research, DOSAR enables researchers and educators at the federated institutions to access grid resources outside the HEP context and is a catalyst in establishing state-wide grid structures. This talk will describe the architecture of the DOSAR VO, the use and functionality of the grid, and the experience of operating the grid for simulation, reprocessing and analysis of data from the Dzero experiment.
BIO

At Louisiana Tech University, Dr. Zeno Greenwood is actively involved in High Energy Physics (HEP) research as a member (and former Director) of the Center for Applied Physics Studies (CAPS). Dr. Greenwood earned his Ph.D. at the University of South Carolina where he did Neutrino Physics research under Prof. F.T. Avignone. He continued research in this area with the Reines Neutrino Group at UC-Irvine before joining the faculty at Louisiana Tech. At LaTech, Dr. Greenwood was a founding member of the CAPS team doing HEP research on the Dzero Experiment at Fermilab. On Dzero, Dr. Greenwood has been active in the development of grid computing clusters for remote analysis and instrumental in the formation of the Distributed Organization for Scientific and Academic Research (DOSAR). Dr. Greenwood is also a member of the Scientific Advisory Committee of the Louisiana Optical Network Initiative, which will greatly enhance grid computing in Louisiana. Member institutions of the DzeroØexperiment at the Fermilab Tevatron and the ATLAS or CMS experiments at the LHC in Europe, have formed the Distributed Organization for Scientific and Academic Research (DOSAR). A consortium of universities in the US, Brazil, Mexico and India, DOSAR is a federated computing grid organization encompassing numerous institutional grids. While founded for High Energy Physics (HEP) research, DOSAR enables researchers and educators at the federated institutions to access grid resources outside the HEP context and is a catalyst in establishing state-wide grid structures. This talk will describe the architecture of the DOSAR VO, the use and functionality of the grid, and the experience of operating the grid for simulation, reprocessing and analysis of data from the Dzero experiment.

ENDYNE: Electron Nuclear Dynamics Simulations on the Grid
Jerry Perez, Senior Administrator, High Performance Computing Center, Texas Tech University
ABSTRACT
The Computational Chemist at Texas Tech University are challenged to meet research deadlines to facilitate funding goals for their staff and post-docs. They asked the Texas Tech High Performance Computing Center for more CPU time on the Beowulf clusters as well as help "grid enabling" their application onto Texas Tech's campus-wide grid: Tech Grid. This paper will discuss the challenges of "grid enabling" ENDYNE onto the campus-wide grid as well as the challenges of "grid-enabling" ENDYNE on the SURA grid.
BIO
Jerry Perez is Senior Administrator for the High Performance Computing Center at Texas Tech University. His experience also includes adjunct teaching in MIS and 5 years as Senior Product Engineer at Texas Instruments. He holds a BS in Organizational Management, an M.B.A. and is currently on his PhD in Computer Science. Jerry has authored or co-authored several papers on the implementation of grids to support a variety of specific application areas, including digital content, physics, and engineering. Other synergistic activities include: participation in the development and deployment of a multi-organizational compute grid at TTU (TechGrid); lead for deployment of grid technologies with TTU Business, Physics, Computer Science, and Mathematics departments; collaboration in SURAgrid, including contribution to the white paper, SURAgrid Authorization/Authorization: Concepts & Technologies.

ADCIRC Coastal Modeling on the Grid
Lavanya Ramakrishnan, Senior Research Programmer, Renaissance Computing Institute
ABSTRACT
The summer and early fall tropical cyclone activity in the Atlantic ocean demands accurate operational forecasts of tidal and storm- surge water levels along the US Eastern and Gulf coasts. It is also recognized that one model solution, driven by one hurricane pressure and wind field forecast realization, may not represent the best possible operational simulation of a specific storm surge scenario. We are developing a grid computing-based, distributed system for the real-time computation of tidal and storm-driven water levels along the US East and Gulf coasts. This talk will discuss the grid-based architecture that enables large scale coastal modeling, such as ADCIRC ensemble modeling, and discusses experiences from the prototype implementation on the SCOOP testbed and the SURAGrid.
BIO

Lavanya Ramakrishnan is a Senior Research Programmer at the Renaissance Computing Institute. Her interests include grid and high-performance computing with a focus on monitoring and orchestration of workflows and design of portal environments for application areas such as biology, meteorology and oceanography. Ramakrishnan has a master’s degree in Computer Science and is pursuing a doctoral degree at Indiana University, Bloomington. Contact: lavanya@renci.org.

Research on the World Community Grid
Viktors Berstis, Technical lead, architect & scientist, WorldCommunityGrid.org, IBM Global Services/Grid Computing Initiative
ABSTRACT
World Community Grid's mission is to create the largest public computing grid to benefit humanity. Our work is built on the belief that technological innovation combined with visionary scientific research and large-scale volunteerism can change our world for the better.

"Ask-a-Grid-Expert" Panel & Interaction
Moderator:
Art Vandenberg, Georgia State University

BIO
Art Vandenberg has a Master's degree in Information & Computer Sciences from Georgia Institute of Technology, where he held various research, support and development roles. As Director of Advanced Campus Services at Georgia State University, he evaluates and implements middleware infrastructure and research computing. Current activities include directory deployment, grid middleware and collaboration with faculty researchers on HPC and grids. Art is working with SURA and the regional SURAgrid project and is co-PI on an NSF Information Technology Research grant investigating a unique approach to resolving metadata heterogeneity for information integration.

Brian Hammond Ph.D., Business Development Manager, Global Education and Research, Sun Microsystems, Inc.
BIO

Brian Hammond is the Business Development Manager for Grid Infrastructure in Sun Microsystems' Global Education & Research line of business. Brian has worked in high performance computing for the last 20 years. He earned a Ph.D. in Theoretical Chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley. Brian has worked for IBM, Cray, Fujitsu and Sun in HPC applications and architectures. He is currently responsible for e-Science and cyberinfrastructure business development for Sun to academic and not-for-profit research institutions.

Ed Hubbard, Founder & Chief Marketing Officer, United Devices
BIO
Ed has over fifteen years of experience working for some of the leading companies in the technology industry including IBM, Microsoft, Intel and Dell. In 1999 Ed founded United Devices, one of the leading commercial Grid computing companies, with over 100 customers around the world including 5 of the top 6 pharmaceutical companies. Ed is a published author, holds issued patents and is the author of more than 20 patent applications. He has spoken at numerous industry events and appeared on a number of broadcast programs, including CNBC, CNN, NBC, ABC and TechTV. Ed was named a BioIT World Champion in 2002 and was recognized as a Computerworld Laureate in 2004 for his contributions to the technology industry in Medicine.

Matt Blythe (Cisco Systems)
BIO
Matt Blythe is responsible technical product management for Cisco's SFS InfiniBand switching infrastructure and high performance computing products. Matt has over 10 years of experience in the high performance clustering space, including speaking extensively around the world on high-performance and grid computing, and architecting some of the largest InfiniBand clusters in the world, including a recent 4,400-node supercomputing cluster for the Department of Energy at Sandia National Laboratory. Matt has three degrees from Stanford University, including a B.S. and M.S. in Computer Science, with an emphasis on distributed systems.

Grid Operations & Support
Leigh Grundhoefer, iVDGL/Indiana University
ABSTRACT
This talk will review the activities of the Grid Operations Center for Open Science Grid (OSG). OSG Operations is a distributed facility which coordinates the provisioning of common software services, the registration of defined elements and the management of the deployed cyber infrastructure. A detailed discussion of the procedures to arrive and maintain production grid services and of the OSG registration procedures for the defined elements; grids, resources, support centers, and virtual organizations (which include the application base) will be included."
BIO

Leigh Grundhoefer received a Bachelor of Science in Applied Computer Technology from Indiana State University in Terre Haute, Indiana. She has held positions as a Software Design Engineer and Unix Systems Administrator and spent five years in the telecommunication industry before taking a position with the Indiana University Computer Science Department. In 1995, she moved from the Computer Science Department to University Information and Technology Services, where she has held several positions: Managed group of junior Unix support professionals; Supercomputer system administration for the SCAAMP project; Developed and deployed the High Performance Storage System (HPSS) infrastructure; technical and developmental support to the Research and Technical Services group. Leigh is currently working with High Energy Physics group to create an international virtual data grid laboratory.

Resources for Getting Started: The Culinary Art of Grids
Mary Trauner, IT/HPC Consultant, Georgia Institute of Technology &
Mary Fran Yafchak, IT Program Coordinator, SURA
ABSTRACT
As organizations begin active implementation of grid technology as a tool to enable collaborative research, education and participation in e-science and other initiatives, resources are needed to demystify the current "buzz-scape" of grids and provide a balanced foundation for educated decision-making. This talk will showcase the "Grid Technology Cookbook", a collaborative development of SURA, Mary Trauner (of the ViDe Video Conferencing Cookbook), and the OpenScienceGrid, providing the rationale behind this effort, the latest project status and a preview of first-version material. Some additional resources for getting started with grids will also be highlighted.
BIO
Mary Trauner is a consultant with the Georgia Institute of Technology, SURA, and ViDe. With thirty years experience in computational support and management for high performance computing at Georgia Tech's Academic and Research Technologies, her work has been devoted to assisting faculty and graduate students in the use of advanced network applications including high performance and parallel computing and digital video conferencing. Accomplishments include: development of numerous HPC documents and tutorials; co-PI of the NSF-supported SEPSCOR project producing an interactive tutorial on building and optimizing parallel codes for shared memory supercomputers; author and co-editor of the ViDe Videoconferencing Cookbook; investigation of new technologies in areas such as grid computing and application sharing/data collaboration through associations with the Open Science Grid, ViDe, and the Internet2 Commons. Her educational background includes Master of Science degrees in Computer Science and Atmospheric Science.

 

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